Develop, test and implement informatics capabilities to identify, target and manage people with stroke who have multiple morbidities

South LondonStroke
Start Date: 1 Jan 2013

Develop, test and implement informatics capabilities to identify, target and manage people with stroke who have multiple morbidities

Background

Research has shown that the majority of stroke patients are not systematically followed up despite our estimates that 30 per cent are depressed, have cognitive impairment, poor mobility and poor quality of life.

People who have a stroke may also have heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. If all the relevant information about one patient is available on one screen, it will make it easier for GPs to offer personalised, integrated care and improvement the management of long-term conditions.

Project activity

The research team is developing a prototype of an advanced information system that can allow medical records and other information collected about stroke survivors to be used for research; to help plan services; and to inform healthcare professionals’ decisions. The research team is working with potential users of a new system – health and social care professionals, researchers and commissioners – as well as stroke survivors and their family members and carers to inform its design and development.

The stroke research team is discussing the ethical and regulatory implications of creating a new system with potential users. The questions to be answered include whether people can choose to opt out of the system – whether they can choose not to share their information in this way, and if so, how will they do that – and who will manage access to the dataset.

Contact 
Professor Charles Wolfe
charles.wolfe@kcl.ac.uk