Association between undiagnosed hypertension and microalbuminuria in South Asians without known diabetes.

East MidlandsMetabolic and Endocrine
Published Date: 29 Mar 2015

Abstract

Data suggest increased rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in those with undiagnosed hypertension (HTN). Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of CKD in undiagnosed hypertensives in a previously unreported subgroup of individuals of South Asian ethnicity. We analysed data from subjects in the ADDITION-Leicester study, a UK based multiethnic, community diabetes screening study. Standard definitions included: HTN-mean recorded BP of ⩾140/90 mm Hg, CKD stage 3 and above-estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m2 and microalbuminuria as albumin creatinine ratio ⩾3 mg mmol(-1). Logistic regression was performed with age, gender and body mass index (kg m(-2)) as co-variates. 6082 individuals (52.5% female, mean age, 57.2 years; White European, 77.8% and South Asian, 22.0%), 31.1% had undiagnosed HTN. Overall, individuals with undiagnosed HTN compared with normotensives had an odds ratio for microalbuminuria of 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.72-2.94). For South Asians, the odds ratio was 3.81. (95% CI: 2.24-6.47) for microalbuminuria with a trend towards an eGFR<60 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m2. Future studies should consider intensified screening for HTN to refine the population suitable for CKD screening, particularly in the South Asian ethnic group.

Contact 
Professor Kamlesh Khunti
kk22@le.ac.uk